CocaCola Amatil sales decline amid challenging conditions

first_imgCoca-Cola Amatil sales decline amid ‘challenging conditions’Posted By: News Deskon: August 24, 2017In: Beverage, Business, Financial, Industries, Packaging, Soft drinksPrintEmailCoca-Cola Amatil has seen a decline of almost 4% in its domestic sales in Australia for the first half of 2017, compared to the corresponding period. In its recent results, the group, which operates six markets across Australasia, posted sales of AUD 2.42 billion ($1.91 billion)Meanwhile, profit also saw a decline of 29% for the first half of the year, which the company states is down to ‘weaker soft drink and water sales’.The group hopes that new products, including Coca-Cola No Sugar and Keri Juice Blenders, launched in June, will boost its performance in the second half of 2017. Coca-Cola Amatil managing director Alison Watkins said: “We’re seeing the advantages of a diverse portfolio of products and businesses – our growth segments and opportunities have performed well in this half to partially offset challenging conditions in Australian Beverages.“Challenges will continue, our confidence in the fundamentals of our business and the work we have underway to stabilise and grow in Australia means that our medium-term targets continue to be: mid-single digit EPS growth, attractive dividends and a strong balance sheet and return on capital.“That said, we have seen improving performance in Australia since April as we progress portfolio, route-to-market, revenue growth management and cost optimisation initiatives. We are looking to build on this improving performance in the second half.”Share with your network: Tags: Coca-Cola Amatilsoft drinkslast_img read more

Video Glanbia reveals BevEdge pea protein in the US

first_imgVideo: Glanbia reveals BevEdge pea protein in the USPosted By: Darren Woodon: October 13, 2017In: FoodBev TV, Industries, Ingredients, Innovation, New products, Podcasts, VideosPrintEmailGlanbia Nutritionals has released a new pea protein product called BevEdge in the US. Aiming to use its dairy protein expertise in the pea protein market the product mixes with water with ‘unprecedented dispersibility’, the company says.BevEdge is made from Canadian yellow peas, delivering a high level of protein, while keeping within the clean label trend.Glanbia’s senior product manager of proteins, Danielle Black spoke with FoodBev Media’s Darren Wood about the pea protein range and what sets it apart from other protein products on the market.To listen to a podcast of this interview click here.Recorded, produced and hosted by: Darren WoodVisit our FoodBev.com YouTube channelShare with your network: Tags: BevEdgeGlanbia Nutritionalslast_img read more

CocaCola opens its 45th bottling plant in China investing 755m

first_imgCoca-Cola opens its 45th bottling plant in China, investing $75.5mPosted By: News Deskon: December 06, 2017In: Beverage, IndustriesPrintEmailCoca-Cola has opened its 45th bottling plant in China, which is the company’s largest bottling plant in northern China.Located in the Hebei province, CNY 500 million ($75.6 million) was invested to get the plant up and running to produce bottled water, Coke and Sprite in order to meet growing demand in the region.The site was built as part of a joint venture between Coca-Cola and its China partner COFCO Coca-Cola Beverages.The opening ceremony was attended by Coca Cola’s CEO James Quincey and Zhao Shuanglian, chairman of COFCO.Quincey said: “As Coca-Cola’s third largest market in the world, China represents an important and exciting opportunity for us, and I am confident of the future of the Chinese market.“We will continue to work with COFCO, and through continuous innovation we will create more products for Chinese consumers.”Luan Xiuju, president of COFCO Coca-Cola Beverages, added: “COFCO is one of Coca-Cola’s key partners in the world and the co-operation between both parties will continue to expand and deepen.”Share with your network: Tags: ChinaCoca-ColaCOFCOlast_img read more

Greens introduces singleserve sachets of blancmange mixes

first_imgGreen’s introduces single-serve sachets of blancmange mixesPosted By: News Deskon: May 23, 2018In: Food, Industries, New productsPrintEmailBritish cake mix company Green’s has launched new single sachets of ready-to-mix blancmange, available in the UK.The blancmange single packets come in three flavours: chocolate, vanilla and strawberry. Green’s said it aims to offer “a nostalgic product that is fun and easy to make”.To create the dessert, customers need to add milk to the contents of the sachet, bring to the boil, pour the mix into a mould, and then let it set for at least three hours.Green’s spokesperson Rob Allardyce said: “Blancmange has been one of our best sellers for many years, and we are delighted to be offering our customers single sachets of their favourite flavours now.“We have tested and tasted a variety of ingredients and believe that our customers will be able to make the best blancmange desserts in their own home with our new sachets. The news of the launch has been welcomed by both our online customers and retail clients.”The Green’s product range also includes cake mixes as well as savoury dumplings and Yorkshire puddings mixes. The company said that each of its mixes are made with natural ingredients and no artificial colourings.Share with your network: Tags: Cake mixdessertUKlast_img read more

The Safe Fair Food Company unveils line of pea protein chips

first_imgThe Safe + Fair Food Company unveils line of pea protein chipsPosted By: Contributoron: January 04, 2019In: Food, Industries, Innovation, New products, SnacksPrintEmailUS-based The Safe + Fair Food Company has launched a line of pea protein chips which are free from five of the top eight allergens.Made with lentil flour and pea protein, the gluten-free range is available in three flavours: hickory BBQ, sea salt, and sweet jalapeño.The chips boast between nine and ten grams of protein per serving and are free from artificial ingredients and preservatives.The Safe + Fair Food Company CEO Will Holsworth said: “Consumers are showing greater interest in plant-based food and are actively seeking protein-rich snack options in this category.“Our goal is to create products that cater to this growing consumer demand, while meeting the needs of the food allergy community.”Last year, Chicago-based Safe + Fair launched a line of popcorn quinoa chips, with three flavours available: olive oil and sea salt, sweet and salty kettle, and sweet sriracha.The new pea protein chips follow the brand’s portfolio expansion across multiple categories as it aims to bring clean-label foods to those with food allergies and restricted diets. Its portfolio now consists of cookies, granola, grahams, mac and cheese, and a cake mix.The Safe + Fair Food Company was founded by friends Dave Leyrer and Pete Najarian, who found themselves frustrated by the lack of safe foods for their children.Each flavour of the pea protein chips is sold in a 3.5-ounce bag individually for $3.49 or as a bundle with one of each flavour for $9.99.Share with your network: Tags: proteinThe Safe + Fair Food CompanyUSlast_img read more

Jared Kushners property empire had to thrive under Trump right Wrong

first_img Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp Sun 4 Feb 2018 07.00 EST Facebook Share on Facebook Share via Email Shares520520 Since you’re here… Jared Kushner’s company under renewed scrutiny over Chinese and Israeli deals Jared’s father, Charles Kushner, centre, arrives at Newark federal court in New Jersey, where he was sentenced to prison time for tax evasion, witness tampering and illegal campaign donations. Photograph: New York Daily News Archive/NY Daily News via Getty Images The former New York Times building on West 44th Street in Manhattan is a case in point. Amid an economy that Trump constantly touts as “tremendous” the part-owned Kushner property near Times Square is facing a number of tenant defaults and presents a forlorn face to the world. One restaurant, Guy’s American, owned by spike-haired celebrity chef Guy Fieri, has closed down and construction of a planned Todd English’s food hall has stalled, its windows plastered over with brown paper. According to a Bloomberg report, investors were told the building would generate $24m in rent annually. But tenant problems suggest a potential shortfall of at least $9m. “We’re holding our own,” offered a concierge at Gulliver’s Gate, a miniature-scale Manhattan that was reported to be two months in rent arrears as of December. “It can only get better.” Facebook The 666 Fifth Avenue skyscraper is routinely described as a monster headache. Almost a year ago, the Kushners ended talks with Anbang, the Chinese insurance giant with ties to the Chinese government, regarding the building’s redevelopment. The Kushners favour knocking down the 41-storey tower and building one twice the size in its place. The property’s underlying $1.2bn loan comes due later this year. Efforts to secure funding have reportedly included approaches to South Korea’s sovereign wealth fund, France’s richest man, Israeli banks and a Saudi developer, China and Qatar.The 666 Fifth Avenue deal, which was supposed to establish the younger Kushner’s career, came after the company sold off thousands of financially reliable rental apartment buildings. According to a lengthy investigation published by Bloomberg last summer, debt payments have almost always eclipsed net income on the building and the deed to the property could be seized by lenders in the event of a default. According to Michael Wolff’s bestselling White House exposé, Fire and Fury, former Trump strategist Steve Bannon was especially damning in his assessment of the building’s potential to undo the fortunes of his White House rival. “When it goes under next year, the whole thing’s cross-collateralized … he’s wiped, he’s gone, he’s done, it’s over … Toast,” Wolff quoted Bannon as saying. A Kushner spokeswoman rejected Bannon’s assertion, telling the New York Daily News: “666 Fifth Ave is but a small part of the company’s overall portfolio and the family’s net worth.” According to the company website, Kushner Companies did $2.5bn worth of transactions last year – a record.And yet a year after Jared Kushner vowed to cut ties with his family firm as he positioned himself for a new life in politics, those ties have both his careers in knots.This article was amended on 4 February 2018 to correct an erroneous reference to One Herald Square. We should have said One Journal Square. Share on Twitter Pinterest Share on Facebook The old New York Times building on Times Square, Manhattan, NYC. Located at 229 W 43rd Street, it is 51% owned by Jared Kushner. Photograph: Simon Leigh/The Guardian Jared Kushner: Steve Bannon was quoted in Fire and Fury as saying that when one building investment ‘goes under’, ‘he’s wiped, he’s gone, he’s done, it’s over …… Toast.’Photograph: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images,The first son-in-law has run into trouble with some high-profile buildings but has rejected claims that debts could sink himby Edward Helmore in New York,Main image:Jared Kushner: Steve Bannon was quoted in Fire and Fury as saying that when one building investment ‘goes under’, ‘he’s wiped, he’s gone, he’s done, it’s over …… Toast.’Photograph: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images It wasn’t supposed to be this way. Despite stepping down as chief executive of the family real estate business and resigning from an additional 266 corporate positions in order to serve his father-in-law’s administration, Kushner has found his business dealings have cast a long shadow over his White House advisory position, a role that does not enjoy the same conflict-of-interest protections afforded the president.Kushner Companies has dropped efforts to raise $150m from Chinese investors for a New Jersey building project, One Journal Square, which attracted accusations of attempts to leverage ties to the Trump administration.Through the controversial EB-5 visa programme, Chinese investors committing more than $500,000 can gain admittance to the US. A presentation on the Kushner project in Beijing, given by Jared Kushner’s sister Nicole Kushner Meyer, included an image of Donald Trump and advertisements that mentioned “government support” and “celebrity developers”.One Journal Square, which recently lost WeWork, the work-share giant, as an anchor tenant, has been beset by problems. Last May, the developer acknowledged receiving a demand from the Brooklyn US attorney’s office for documents regarding its use of the controversial investment-for-visas programme.David North, a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies who is an outspoken critic of visas for investment, said: “The Kushners’ problems are symbolic of the multiple troubles of the EB-5 programme. They’ve been among the largest and most prominent users of the program, so it’s significant they are withdrawing from the field.”The Kushner Companies general counsel, Emily Wolf, said in a statement: “Kushner Companies utilised the programme, fully complied with its rules and regulations and did nothing improper. We are cooperating with legal requests for information.”‘They can knock themselves out’One Journal Square is not the only project proving problematic for Kushner Companies. In December, it was reported that investigators working for special counsel Robert Mueller looking into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election, asked Deutsche Bank for data on accounts held by Trump and his family. Mueller’s Russia-focused team is also said to be looking into a $285m loan on the West 44th Street building that Deutsche Bank struck a month before election day 2016.That deal is the focus of New York prosecutors who have requested documents from the German bank relating to the property, debt on which was used by the Kushners to take out $59m in cash. However, there is no indication that the subpoena is related to the company’s use of EB-5 or Mueller’s inquiry.Jay Sekulow, a member of the president’s legal team, denied that Deutsche had received any subpoena for financial records from US investigators. Read more A year into the Trump presidency that was supposed to bring prosperity to the nation, Jared Kushner, a key member of the president’s inner circle, has yet to see dividends. The Trump presidency has so far proved more bane than boon to Kushner Companies, the family firm of the White House senior adviser. A man walks out of the 666 Fifth Avenue office tower in Manhattan owned by the Kushner Companies in March 2017. Photograph: Richard Drew/AP Twitter Pinterest Share on Twitter Share via Email Topics Share on Messenger … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. It may be a measure of the duress the family is under that Jared’s typically press-averse father, Charles Kushner, volunteered to the Washington Post that he was confident no charges would result from either investigation. Charles Kushner spent 14 months in federal prison in Alabama, after being convicted in 2005 on charges of tax evasion, witness tampering and illegal campaign donations.“All I know is that we are not at all concerned and we are cooperating,” the elder Kushner told the Post. “And they can knock themselves out for the next 10 years reading those papers as far as I’m concerned.”Kushner Sr also said he had no indication that the company was a subject of Mueller’s investigation into Russian election meddling. Mueller reportedly interviewed the younger Kushner for 45 minutes in November. The financing of another troubled Kushner building, the ominously numbered 666 Fifth Avenue, a 41-storey tower purchased for a record $1.8bn in 2005, is also under scrutiny. Congressional committees are eager to learn more about a meeting the younger Kushner had last year with the then Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, when he allegedly discussed whether the Trump transition team could use a back channel to communicate with Russian officials about Syria.Before appearing before a Senate intelligence committee in July, Kushner released a statement denying that he had proposed “an on-going secret form of communication for then or for when the administration took office”.Congressional officials are believed to have questioned Kushner about a subsequent December 2016 meeting with a Russian banking executive, Sergey Gorkov, the head of the US-sanctioned Vnesheconombank, held at Kislyak’s behest.The bank has said Gorkov met Kushner to discuss “promising business lines and sectors”. In his statement, Kushner said that meeting did not involve “any discussion” about the family company, “real estate projects” or “loans”. Real estate Twitter Twitter Jared Kushner’s property empire had to thrive under Trump, right? Wrong features Last modified on Mon 5 Feb 2018 11.13 EST Pinterest Share on Pinterest Support The Guardian Reuse this contentlast_img read more

The fight for the right to be a Muslim in America

first_img Pinterest US politics Twitter Reuse this content The long read Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Chaudry preparing the Bernards Township community centre for Friday prayers. Photograph: Fred R Conrad/The Guardian Facebook Sure enough, the transcripts of the dozens of hearings held by the town’s planning board, which run to nearly 7,000 pages, contain no mention of sharia, the Muslim Brotherhood or other rightwing hobgoblins. Most residents swore that religion had nothing to do with their opposition. But the Islamic society’s lawyers suspected – and would later allege in court – that their opponents were showing another face when they talked to each other on the internet. A commenter named “LC” – who appeared to be Caratzola – often expressed anti-Muslim sentiments when the mosque was debated on local web forums and national sites with names such as Bare Naked Islam. (Motto: “It isn’t Islamophobia when they really ARE trying to kill you.”) Caratzola was also listed as a member of a Gaffney-affiliated group set up to defend against the supposedly creeping influence of sharia on US courts. (“I stand by that,” Caratzola later told the New York Times, claiming that “every single terrorist attack in the last 20 years was committed by Muslims”.)In December 2015, a few days after a Muslim husband and wife killed 14 people in a terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, and shortly before candidate Donald Trump proposed a “total and complete shutdown” of Muslim immigration, the town’s planning board voted to reject the mosque.At Caratzola’s urging, the town government also adopted a new ordinance that raised the minimum size of the plot required to build any new house of worship – which would effectively prevent the Islamic Society from building on its own site in the future. The Islamic Society quickly filed a lawsuit against the township, alleging the opposition was a “well-funded machine” that was “substantially grounded in anti-Muslim animus”.The lawsuit particularly highlighted Caratzola’s role as a ringleader of the opposition. In a letter to a local newspaper, she accused the Islamic Society of “slander” – and invoked the concept of taqiyya to suggest that Chaudry’s mosque proposal was not what it seemed. “Many people and groups in the Muslim community,” she wrote, “are trying to quash what we so fervently cherish in America – the freedom of speech.”The Islamic Society also claimed it had the constitution on its side – specifically, the first-amendment protection of the freedoms of religion and assembly. And Chaudry could call upon a powerful ally: Barack Obama. Under his administration, the Justice Department intervened on behalf of Muslims in many mosque disputes, including a highly publicised case in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where the construction of a mosque was opposed with lawsuits, protests and an arson attack. It was able to rely on a powerful legal tool: a law, originally passed with bipartisan support in 2000, that specifically bans local governments from discriminating against religious organisations when it comes to land use.The enforcement policy “reflected the fact that Islamophobia is a real problem across America”, said Tom Perez, who handled the Murfreesboro case as a director of the Civil Rights Division. (He is currently chairman of the Democratic National Committee.) “I think as you see the proliferation of social media, the world has gotten smaller,” Perez told me. “People who harbour these extreme views have a virtual platform to spread their hate.”In 2016, the US Justice Department filed its own lawsuit, claiming that the local planning board violated the Islamic Society’s rights in rejecting its building plan. To Islamophobic activists, who spent the eight years of Obama’s presidency promoting conspiracy theories about his birth certificate and suggesting he was secretly a Muslim, such moves were yet more evidence of the administration’s suspiciously sympathetic stance toward Islam. “Islamic supremacists and Muslim Brotherhood organisations … called upon their running dogs at the Department of Justice to impose the sharia and usurp American law for Islamic law,” Pam Geller wrote in a blogpost about the Basking Ridge mosque case. “What small town can go up against the US government’s vast resources and endless taxpayer-funded muscle?”The federal government’s intervention had a radicalising effect in Liberty Corner. The neighbourhood’s enemy was no longer a pushy former mayor; it was President Obama. Then, as if a Justice Department investigation wasn’t intrusive enough, private citizens started receiving knocks on their doors from people carrying subpoenas, seeking to probe their email and social media accounts. The Islamic Society’s lawyers – members of a prestigious Manhattan firm that was working pro-bono – wanted to prove that Caratzola was really the commenter “LC”, and that she and her allies were communicating their true attitudes to each other – and to their elected leaders – outside of the public meetings. Understandably, though, the private citizens felt threatened by the intrusion. Their complaints attracted the attention of the Thomas More Law Center, which intervened on the behalf of residents seeking to quash the subpoenas, claiming that the demand would have a chilling effect on free speech. On its website, the Law Center decried the “outrageous unconstitutional intimidation”, alongside a heroic photo of Caratzola standing in front of an American flag. “Lori Caratzola,” the caption read. “Persecuted for opposing the mosque.”On 31 December 2016, a federal judge issued a preliminary decision in the Basking Ridge case, finding that the planning board had exercised “unbridled and unconstitutional discretion” in requiring the mosque to have more parking than other houses of worship. Though the case was far from over, it was clear that the law favoured Chaudry. The victory rang hollow, though. Trump had just been elected president, giving a jarring rebuke to liberal values, and placing Muslim-Americans like Chaudry in a newly precarious position.As a candidate, to bolster his call for a ban on Muslim immigration, Trump had often cited the research from the Center for Security Policy, Gaffney’s group. (“Very highly respected people, who I know, actually.”) Some of his most important advisers, such as Steve Bannon and Mike Pompeo, soon to be named the CIA director, were outspoken Gaffney admirers. Gaffney saluted the new attorney general, Jeff Sessions – the 2015 winner of the Center for Security Policy’s “Keeper of the Flame” award – for his vigilance “against all enemies, foreign and domestic”. With Sessions and other members of the nativist right in charge of the federal government, the Justice Department’s commitment toward protecting Muslims and their mosques looked shaky.On a chilly Friday in April last year, still early in Trump’s presidency, I helped Chaudry as he performed his weekly ritual, carrying items from the garage of the old house in Liberty Corner to his gold Toyota SUV. In went eight rolled-up prayer rugs, then the plastic donation boxes, the folding music stand that serves as a lectern, the sound system, the digital clock, which was synchronised with Mecca, and four decorative mats, which Chaudry uses to slightly sanctify the drab walls of the community centre that the Islamic Society currently uses for its Jummah service. When the SUV, known as the “Mosque Mobile”, was full, Chaudry would drive it across town for prayers. “I’m just overwhelmed with everything that is going on,” he said as we got in the car. For the past few months, Trump had been fighting to impose his ban on travellers from seven Muslim-majority nations, sparking court confrontations and massive protests.Chaudry was responding to the crisis with a characteristic burst of civic activity, participating in political forums and interfaith vigils. The relationship between Muslim communities and their government was wary at the best of times, and Trump was making it much worse, but Chaudry saw himself as a trust-building emissary. He served on advisory panels to law enforcement. A few weeks before, he’d spoken about discrimination and the travel ban at a worried meeting between Muslim leaders and many prominent New Jersey politicians. At the forum, as he did nearly everywhere he went, Chaudry promoted an earnest personal cause, asking everyone present to take a formal pledge he’d composed, to “Stand up for the Other”.The Mosque Mobile turned on to Church Street, the main road through Liberty Corner. The neighbourhood traced its name back to the American revolution, and the whole town took great patriotic pride in the role it had played in the independence struggle, as a stronghold for George Washington’s army. Chaudry took a roundabout route, pointing out horse farms and new tract developments, and a park where the Islamic Society prayed when the community centre was used for a summer camp. “Where the flag is, this is the 9/11 memorial,” Chaudry said. “I was on the township committee when we did that. Eighteen people here died.” A wooded road took us into Basking Ridge. In the yard of its Presbyterian church, founded in 1717, stood an ancient tree known as the “Holy Oak”, where Washington is said to have picnicked with the Marquis de Lafayette. Twitter Twitter Then someone smashed the mailbox. “I was, of course, very surprised,” Chaudry said. Under New Jersey’s planning laws, the Islamic Society had to secure the approval of the municipal government to build the mosque, and from his experience as a public official, Chaudry knew that the town, which prided itself on its quaint homes and a history dating back to colonial times, was resistant to new development of any kind. But this was a house of worship, and he was someone well-known to the community. “It’s not that I was expecting any favours,” Chaudry said. “I expected them to be fair.” What shocked him, though, was the hatred.That was seven long years ago, before some townspeople formed a group calling for “responsible development” in furious opposition to the mosque, before the 39 planning board hearings, before the mosque was rejected, before Chaudry filed a lawsuit alleging religious prejudice, before his lawyers uncovered racially charged emails among officials opposed to his plan, before the Obama administration accused the town of civil rights violations, before national rightwing activists took notice of the dispute and began smearing Chaudry as a terrorist sympathiser, and before Trump dragged anti-Muslim conspiracy theories from the disreputable fringes into the White House. Today, Chaudry knows his town – and America – better.Long before Trump came along to capitalise on it, though, Islamophobia was building in the US, bubbling up like swamp gas from the depths. Often, racial conflict would manifest itself in small, seemingly isolated local planning fights over proposals to build mosques. The US Department of Justice, which staunchly defended the rights of Muslims during the Obama administration, noted a sharp increase in such mosque disputes between 2010 and 2016. Many took place in conservative locales such as rural Murfreesboro, Tennessee. But they also broke out in unexpected places such as Basking Ridge: a wealthy and well-educated community in the outwardly tolerant north-eastern US.Basking Ridge is governed by a five-person elected committee, which meets in a repurposed Tudor-style mansion. (It previously belonged to John Jacob Astor VI, an American aristocrat whose father perished on the Titanic.) One evening last year, I attended a meeting – the first of many – at the town hall, where the committee members sat on a long dais, discussing their usual business, such as preparations for an upcoming celebration of the signing of Basking Ridge’s royal charter, in 1760. When the meeting was opened to comments from the public, however, all anyone wanted to talk about was Chaudry and the mosque.“The neighbours near this proposed mosque did not sign up to live next to this house of worship,” said one resident, who broke down sobbing as she spoke. “They have been members of a quiet residential neighbourhood for decades, and do not look forward to having their routines and lives disrupted.”The residents said the mosque would create traffic and commotion, and would ruin their property values. But they also complained about the tactics Chaudry had employed in his bitter court battle. One middle-aged woman gestured toward the mosque opponents in the audience, saying that many had been subjected to “a hateful harassment campaign” by the Islamic Society’s attorneys, who had served them with subpoenas seeking the contents of their personal email and social media accounts, in an effort to prove that they were motivated not by planning concerns, but animosity toward Muslims.“Mr Chaudry has waged an expensive PR campaign that has talked about people as if they’re bigots,” the woman said. “And personally, I think it is the ISBR group that has been bullying and bigoted.” Then she invoked Trump, the inescapable presence. “They talk about our current president and how he speaks about Muslims. Well, I find ISBR’s rhetoric to be just as harmful.”Finally, Loretta Quick, a schoolteacher who lived next door to the mosque site, got up to speak. She was one of the neighbours who had come to Chaudry’s initial open house years before. She had even voted for him, back when he was a politician. Now she was a die-hard enemy of the mosque. “If you cave,” she told the board, in a furious voice, “you’re saying that we are bigots, that we based the decision on discrimination against Islam.”Quick was one of those who had been served with a subpoena, and was being represented by the Thomas More Law Center, an advocacy group that claims its mission is to defend “America’s Judeo-Christian heritage and moral values” against forces waging a “Stealth Jihad” to “transform America into an Islamic nation”. Quick referenced a recent press release the Law Center had put out, which had plucked a few verses from a searchable English translation of the Qur’an that could be accessed on the ISBR website – “Fight and slay the Pagans wherever ye find them”, etc – to suggest that Chaudry was somehow in league with religious extremists.“These are words that seem quite intimidating and threatening to me,” Quick said. “I want to be protected, and you owe that to me, this township and this nation.”How did a small-town property dispute turn into a religious war, with legal and symbolic implications for all of America? Part of the answer has to do with the country’s labyrinthine land-use laws, which leave most control to state and local governments, which are in turn vulnerable to the furies of angry mobs. Part of it has to do with America’s love of litigation. The inherently confrontational and intrusive legal process had a radicalising effect on the town, driving some opponents of the development to extremes.But something else deeper and darker seemed to be at work. Some residents openly discussed Islamophobic conspiracy theories, such as the idea that the mosque was meant to send a message of conquest, due to its proximity to the town’s September 11 memorial. Such crackpot notions, promoted by far-right ideologues such as Pamela Geller and Frank Gaffney, used to be confined to the margins of the internet. Then Trump embraced the Islamophobes, unabashedly.“It’s like his election has given permission to people,” Chaudry told me the first time we met. We were at the proposed site of the mosque, sitting in the old suburban house that he was still hoping to demolish. Its living room, dominated by a large stone fireplace, was filled with boxes of donated clothes that he was preparing to deliver to a family of Syrian refugees. The many bookshelves were lined with theological texts and stacked copies of a paperback that Chaudry likes to give out, Islam Denounces Terrorism. Standing on an easel in a corner was a poster-sized rendering of the proposed mosque. In an effort to make it fit into its suburban surroundings, it had been designed to resemble a mini-mansion, with gray clapboard siding, a pitched roof with asphalt shingles, dormer windows and minarets disguised as chimneys. Shares1,0111011 Forty years ago, Mohammad Ali Chaudry, a Pakistani-born economist, made his home outside New York City. He came for an executive job at the telecoms company AT&T, and ended up working there for decades. Like many immigrants to the US, Chaudry came to wholeheartedly believe – perhaps more fervently than his native-born neighbours – in the triumphal story that Americans tell about their nation: how it was always growing stronger through change, melding the many into one through the process of assimilation. Chaudry was a devout Muslim. But to him, it always seemed the things that made him different mattered less than the ways in which he had proved he was the same.Chaudry and his wife, who is from Italy, raised three children on a street called Manor Drive, in the town of Basking Ridge, in the centre of the state of New Jersey. This is not the “Jersey” of popular imagination – the land of belching smokestacks immortalised in Bruce Springsteen’s working-class anthems. Basking Ridge is out in horse country, an area of rolling green hills and white-steepled churches, not far from Bedminster, where Donald Trump has his summer estate. In keeping with the values of his adopted community, Chaudry became an active member of the local Republican party and a conspicuous civic presence, running for various elected boards. In 2004, at the height of George W Bush’s war in Iraq, Chaudry became the first Pakistani-American to serve as mayor of a municipality in the US.Long after Chaudry retired from both AT&T and electoral politics, he continued to keep a busy schedule of volunteer activities, most focused on building religious tolerance. He ran a small nonprofit organisation called the Center for Understanding Islam, and taught classes at local universities. Chaudry is bantam-sized, with a silvery moustache and a starchy manner, and despite his age – now 75 – he possesses a bottomless reservoir of diligent energy. He would travel the state, speaking to audiences young and old, always dressing the part of a politician, with a little American flag badge in his lapel. If there was prejudice around him in his adopted hometown, Chaudry later said that “it was not obvious, or visible, or overt”.That changed in 2011, when he found a new cause: building a mosque in Basking Ridge. For years, Chaudry and other local Muslims had been using a community centre for a makeshift Friday service. But Chaudry decided that the Islamic Society of Basking Ridge needed a permanent place to pray, and he located what he believed to be a suitable site: a four-acre lot occupied by a rundown Dutch Colonial house. Soon after purchasing it, Chaudry held an open house to greet the neighbours. “There was not too much tension,” he said. “It was kind of jovial.” He put the letters “ISBR” on the mailbox in front of the house, to announce the Islamic Society’s arrival. Pinterest The fight for the right to be a Muslim in America The local Republican party was also in the midst of a schism, and Chaudry and his allies were ultimately driven out by a more conservative faction, which ran on the slogan: “It’s Time To Take Your Town Back.” The bad blood spilled over into the mosque dispute. The most damning evidence produced by the Islamic Society in the course of its lawsuit came from the correspondence of the town’s elected officials, many of whom had formerly served and clashed with Chaudry. They expressed their hostility in raw, racially offensive terms.A town committee member named John Malay compared Chaudry to a stereotypically shifty native character in the 1930s film The Lives of a Bengal Lancer. “We [finally] ousted him, whereupon he went to Mecca, got a funny hat and declared himself the imam of a new mosque here in town,” Malay wrote. “Religion trumps even politics as a refuge for scoundrels, I guess.”Other emails contained jokes about Muslims, pigs and Barack Obama. “Man child,” John Carpenter, another committee member, wrote of Obama. “The product of fools, raised by idiots and coddled by affirmative action. Behold the beast.” The emails revealed that Carpenter had even lobbied to prevent Chaudry from participating in a September 11 commemoration ceremony, alleging he was an extremist. “[Find] a real moderate Muslim,” he wrote. “There must be one. We shouldn’t look the other way on his views – we owe that to our dead residents. Let’s make it happen without that fool.” When the correspondence came out in court filings, Carpenter offered no apologies. “You should not confuse contempt with bigotry,” he told a newspaper. “I’m allowed to not like the guy.”“He’s just a funny guy with this identity thing,” Carpenter told me when we met for coffee at a diner over the summer. “He was known as, quote, ‘Mr Muslim’.”Carpenter, a tall, balding salesman, had served on the town committee for more than a decade, and was running for re-election. He was outraged that his unguarded words had been used to portray him – and the entire township – as racist. “When government tries to see into someone’s heart, that’s when we fall into totalitarianism,” he told me.He advanced a conspiratorial theory, which I heard from other mosque opponents, that Chaudry had been “engineering failure” all along, so that he could sue and win millions in damages, as other mosques had done. He said he believed that Chaudry and the Obama administration had been conspiring. A Justice Department official involved in the investigation of the township, he noted, served with Chaudry on the board of a local university’s Center on Religion, Culture and Conflict. (Chaudry says they never discussed the case.)“I find it ironic that he served on this council for religious conflict, and what he really was trying to do here – and I don’t think he succeeded in the end, because people see through it – is create a religious conflict,” Carpenter said. “I don’t think what happened is fair to the people of the town, and I think it’s important for other people around the country to know what’s coming their way.”Carpenter said he had been hopeful that Trump’s election would bring “a little sanity to the Department of Justice”, and a reversal of its stance on the mosque case, but so far, he had been disappointed. He knew the president was spending his summer vacation at his private club in Bedminster, though, just a quick drive away from Basking Ridge. “He’s there for three weeks,” joked Carpenter, an avid cyclist. “Maybe I could sneak in, ride my bike up the back road: I need to speak to the president!”All year long, as I kept returning to see Chaudry, Donald Trump loomed over our conversation. One Saturday morning in September, on my way to meet Chaudry at a Lutheran Church’s symposium on “Race, Hatred and Bigotry”, I looked up in the sky and saw the presidential helicopter heading toward Bedminster. Trump’s embrace of the worst in politics – fanning terrorism hysteria, retweeting racist memes, refusing to condemn the white nationalist demonstrators in Charlottesville – had real consequences on the ground. “People are emboldened to come out and say things that they never felt they could say before,” Chaudry told the symposium. “They have a licence, because the person in the highest office of the country is engaging in that kind of language.”At one point, the room suddenly filled with a disconcerting roar from low-flying military jets.Chaudry introduced a pair of high school girls, one of whom was wearing hijab, who eloquently described their experiences with bullying confrontations on the school bus and social media platforms. “I would say to my non-Muslim friends: this is the Muslim community,” Chaudry said when they finished their presentation.As the controversy over the mosque moved toward a settlement, the town committee held a series of heated public hearings. Many members of the Islamic Society attended, to show a human face to their neighbours. They always took care to present themselves as model citizens: upscale professionals, and the parents of striving children.“We are not some strange boogeyman that came out of nowhere,” Yasmine Khalil told me. She was a doctor and a vocal mosque supporter, who had moved to the township from Manhattan a few years before. Khalil said she had been dismayed to see the ugliness infiltrate even a private Facebook group for local mothers, where she had got into commenting wars about Islam. “When I wasn’t just quiet and silent and in the background,” she said, “they took it upon themselves to kick me out.” Since you’re here… Twitter Islam Chaudry holding his copy of the Qur’an. Photograph: Fred R Conrad/The Guardian Pinterest The long read Twitter Barack Obama The Liberty Corner Presbyterian church, a few blocks away from the proposed Islamic Center of Basking Ridge. Photograph: Fred R. Conrad/The Guardian Thu 8 Feb 2018 07.35 EST Facebook Share on Twittercenter_img Share via Email Pinterest Facebook Facebook Facebook Chaudry speaking during Friday prayers at the Islamic Society of Basking Ridge. Photograph: Fred R Conrad/The Guardian Share on WhatsApp At one public meeting, a white-haired man – one of the crustier opposing voices – tripped and fell, and Khalil rushed across the room, thinking he might need medical assistance. He was fine, and the meeting went on. Khalil gave a speech, introducing herself as a mother. “We are your friends, we are your neighbours – I could be your doctor,” Khalil said. “I want my kids to feel like they’re welcomed. I want my kids to feel proud of the people that we have chosen to surround them with.”The old man she had just rushed to help piped up: “Move to an appropriate place!”Chaudry said non-Muslims in Basking Ridge would often pull him aside, to quietly confide that they were ashamed about what was happening to the town. He hoped that, at some point, the forces of conciliation would make themselves heard. Instead, the tenor of the debate only grew more hysterical. It reached its climax when a particularly vociferous mosque opponent named Nick Xu, a Chinese-American volunteer for Trump’s campaign, gave a speech claiming that the Islamic Society’s lawsuit was part of a “systematic plot” to wage war through the courts. “If you google ‘Islamic Lawfare’,” he said, “you’re going to see dozens, dozens of these kind of lawsuits.” In response to Xu, a man named James Rickey – a member of one of the town’s old Scots-Irish families – came to his feet, full of righteous contempt. “The tone that has been used here tonight is disgraceful,” Rickey said. “We’re all human beings. We should respect each other.”With that, and without debate, the town committee grimly voted to approve the settlement, agreeing to reverse the planning board’s rejection while paying the Islamic Society $3.5m. John Carpenter was the lone dissenter. The townspeople again raised a loud clamour. “We understand your frustration,” the mayor told them. “But this is what we are required to do by federal law.”A few weeks later, the Islamic Society celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan beneath a white tent set up next to a practice green at the Basking Ridge Country Club. Chaudry addressed the service while standing next to a poster-sized rendering of the mosque. “As many of you know,” he said, “we now have – alhamdulillah, alhamdulillah, alhamdulillah – a settlement with the township, which calls for us to submit a revised plan, and I am honoured to tell you that at 4.49pm yesterday I received from our engineers the plan that we intend to submit tomorrow, inshallah. Many people thought this was impossible. As Nelson Mandela said once, things seem impossible until they are done.”For the holiday, Chaudry had secured the services of a guest imam who spoke of the “constant shockwave” that Trump’s election had sent through the Muslim community in America. When the prayers were finished, Chaudry stood at the front of the tent and accepted congratulations from members of his congregation. “People said, why are we doing this here, where people don’t like us?” he told one. “I say, where can you go where people like you?”It is not yet clear what the Trump presidency will mean for the Justice Department’s policy on mosque disputes. Eric Rassbach, an attorney with the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, an anti-discrimination advocacy group, told me that so far the department “seems to be staying the course”. Still, ideological shifts take time to assert themselves within government bureaucracies, and Tom Perez said there is “every reason to be concerned” about the Justice Department’s direction. “Donald Trump certainly adds gas to the fire,” he said. “That will bring additional pressure to bear on the DOJ to do the wrong thing.”Chaudry no longer considered himself a Republican, for obvious reasons, but he was still guarded in his criticism of Trump. All summer, while the president vacationed nearby, a few self-proclaimed members of the resistance would protest on a street corner in Bedminster. Chaudry never participated. Instead, he organised interfaith prayer services, and tried to be a moderating force. When an alleged Islamic State supporter from New Jersey killed eight people with a truck on a Manhattan bike path in October, Chaudry hastened to arrange a reassuring visit of police officials to a mosque near the suspect’s home, which was receiving death threats. Meanwhile, every time Trump tweeted something horrible about Muslims, Chaudry would wearily draw up a public statement. “With him, you can never tell what he’s going to say,” he said.Under the terms of the Islamic Society’s settlement, the mosque was granted a rehearing before the planning board in August, at which “no commentary regarding Islam or Muslims” was to be considered. The procedure was a mere formality, and the mosque was approved. Lori Caratzola, who recently moved out of Basking Ridge, was not present for the vote. She did not respond to interview requests; neither did the Thomas More Law Center, the rightwing group that came to her aid in the Islamic Society’s lawsuit. With the federal case concluded, the issue of the subpoenas to private citizens is now moot. But the Thomas More Law Center has continued to file lawsuits on the behalf of other mosque opponents, including neighbour Loretta Quick, claiming that their elected representatives had “colluded with ISBR’s ‘Civilization Jihad’”. Another lawsuit, brought by a former member of the planning board, is challenging the mosque’s approval on procedural grounds.“It’s far from over,” Zubulake told me. “We’re going to keep fighting it to the bitter end.”While continuing to fight on the legal front, Chaudry is now raising funds – much of the settlement went to pay his lawyers, who are in turn donating the money to charity – while also going through the permitting process. He hopes to demolish the house soon, so he can hold a groundbreaking ceremony some time in 2018. One person who won’t be attending is the current town mayor, John Carpenter. He promptly appointed Nick Xu – the “Islamic lawfare” guy – to a pair of township boards.Chaudry hopes, though, that constructing the mosque will pave the way for reconciliation with those opponents who are willing to listen. “I am a firm believer – perhaps I am more of an optimist than many people – but I feel that in human nature, when something has been done, people are more willing to accept it,” Chaudry said. “They will find that their fears were baseless.” He has a strong – religious – faith in the notion that differences among people are best overcome through cultural interchange. “Mosques are places where you build those bridges,” he said.A recent Cato Institute survey found that 47% of all Republicans – and a quarter of Americans overall – would support a ban on building new mosques in their communities. Yet Islamophobia, like all prejudices, is rooted in ignorance, and Chaudry felt that if people could just see the inside of a mosque, they would lose their apprehension. “We want to dispel some of these misperceptions that exist,” he said.In addition to his many other activities, Chaudry often teaches about Islam, lecturing at venues ranging from universities to the New Jersey state police academy. Last autumn, he offered a continuing education course to some senior citizens, and he invited me to a culminating event, a tour of a large mosque in the town of South Brunswick. The retirees shuffled across the carpeted floor, awkward and shoeless, as the midday prayer began. The imam, Hamad Ahmad Chebli, welcomed what he called “60 messengers”.After the service, in an adjoining room, Chaudry and the imam took questions. Why were the women and men separated for prayers? Does the Qur’an prohibit women from driving? What’s the deal with sharia, and is it practiced in America? They answered each query patiently, providing some basic theology with a leavening dash of humour. A warm feeling of fellowship inflated like a soap bubble.“I live nearby, and I’ve driven by this Islamic Society any number of times,” said one woman. “And I always wondered, what’s going on in there?”“Making Islamic bombs!” Chebli interjected, eliciting a big laugh.“What we’re doing,” she went on, “is we’re dispelling the mystery.”“There was a strong feeling in the mosque, a feeling of peace,” said an elderly Jewish man. “I was crying, because there was this beauty to all of it.”“I think occasions like this really help us all to understand what Islam and being a Muslim is all about,” said another woman. “And my biggest concern right now is what is happening to this country with our current president.”There was a loud groan of disapproval.“I didn’t mean to bring politics into it … ”“Then why are you?” shouted another audience member. The bubble was punctured.“America does not belong to any president,” the imam said. “America does not belong to any religion. This is our country.” Chaudry sought to defuse the sudden tension. He said he looked forward to welcoming more groups to visit, and learn, in Liberty Corner.“Inshallah,” he said, “when we have our own mosque.”All photographs by Fred R Conrad• Follow the Long Read on Twitter at @gdnlongread, or sign up to the long read weekly email here. The fight for the right to be a Muslim in America – podcast Photograph: Fred R. Conrad/The Guardian,A bitter legal row over a mosque in an affluent New Jersey town shows the new face of Islamophobia in the age of Trump. By Andrew Rice,Main image:Photograph: Fred R. Conrad/The Guardian Listen Mohammad Ali Chaudry, the founder and president of the Islamic Society of Basking Ridge, in his home office. Photograph: Fred R Conrad/The Guardian … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. But the architecture did little to defuse tensions with the surrounding neighbourhood. Liberty Corner considered itself separate from the older and wealthier village of Basking Ridge, though they were both part of the same larger township, and few outsiders recognised the geographical distinction. And as even Chaudry and his allies admitted, some of the locals had a stubborn and ecumenical commitment to protesting anyone who dared to build anything, including Christian churches. People in Liberty Corner expressed an obstreperous ideology often abbreviated as “nimby”, for “not in my backyard”.The opponents of the mosque told their own story of victimisation, in which they were merely objecting to Chaudry’s oppressive development scheme. “It was always about land use,” one Liberty Corner resident told me. “They made it about religion.” The nimby complainers claimed that the mosque site – a marshy plot on a mainly residential street – was a poor location for a busy house of prayer. When the township planning board took up Chaudry’s proposal in August 2012, signs soon appeared in front yards around town, reading “Preserve Liberty Corner”.At one of the first planning hearings, a resident named Lori Caratzola stood up to challenge Chaudry. A law graduate, she cross-examined him about the size of the Islamic Society, accusing him of understating its membership. She revealed that she had done surveillance of a Friday service, counting 125 worshippers going into a space with a capacity for 60. After her confrontational performance, Caratzola became a leader of the opposition.At the public hearings, Caratzola and others confined their criticisms to the nimby issues: drainage, parking, landscaping and the like. They convinced the board that a mosque would need more parking spaces than a church, because midday worshippers would come alone. When the Islamic Society submitted a new plan, with a larger parking lot, the mosque’s opponents protested that, too. It quickly became clear that the opposition was not solely concerned with parking.Around the time the hearings began, some residents received an anonymous piece of mail. Inside was a letter entitled “Meet Your New Neighbor”, and a CD containing a recording of a radio interview in which Chaudry had offered some mildly nuanced opinions on Israel, Hamas and Hezbollah. “Here in Basking Ridge, on the surface, we see the serene, grinning academic Ali Chaudry, always willing to help us better understand the version of Islam he wants us to know,” the letter read. “Scratch the surface a little and an uglier picture emerges.”The author of the letter tenuously linked Chaudry to the Muslim Brotherhood and the “Ground Zero mosque” – a proposed Islamic community centre in Lower Manhattan that Pamela Geller and Fox News had recently whipped up into a national controversy. It cited the term taqiyya, an obscure theological concept that Islamophobes often twist to suggest that Muslims are encouraged to lie about the true nature of their violent beliefs.“So, welcome to the neighbourhood, Ali,” the letter concluded. “Let’s ask Ali about those Koranic verses regarding Jews and Christians in your Koran. Why are so many terroristic acts propagated by Muslims? Is it something they are taught in your mosques and at home? And what will you teach in your new Liberty Corner mosque? You wouldn’t lie to us, would you? Taqiyya is wrong, right?”Just as the author of the letter accused Muslims of deception, the Islamic Society, in its lawsuit, alleged that many of the neighbours were presenting a false front, using preservationist sentiment to disguise their real, less respectable fears. “The key thing to remember,” said Adeel Mangi, an attorney for the Islamic Society, “is that these complaints are commonly used as a smokescreen.”There is, literally, an anti-mosque playbook. Tactics were once unwritten, spread through websites and word of mouth, but more recently they were set down in a book titled Mosques in America: A Guide to Accountable Permit Hearings and Continuing Citizen Oversight. Written by a Texas attorney, it was published by the Center for Security Policy, an organisation headed by Frank Gaffney, a former Reagan administration official who has long espoused the theory that Muslims are engaged in a secret plot to impose sharia law on the US. Gaffney writes in the book’s introduction that it is a “how-to manual for patriotic Americans who are ready to counter the leading edge of Islamic supremacism”.The manual offers lessons from cases like the one in Basking Ridge. “It may be startling to consider, but Islamists are entitled to exploit liberal free speech rights to advance their political and legal operations,” the author warns. It advises residents to express objections in the manner most likely to sway the authorities, avoiding mention of religious issues. “Concerned citizens must learn to express questions and reservations in a manner appropriate to the relevant civic forum’s purpose,” the manual says, instructing readers that “rather than expressing alarm as hysteria, speaking to local government officials and media requires a strategic response based on reason, facts, precedents, and the law”. Donald Trump New Jersey Share on Pinterest Support The Guardian At the community centre, we were joined by Chaudry’s wife, Victoria. We rolled out the mats and set up the speakers, and used a 30-metre (100-ft) sound cable to connect the small main room with an adjacent annex, which was used for overflow. Chaudry pointed, proudly, to his name on a plaque on the wall – he had helped to establish the centre. About a decade before, he and around a dozen other Muslims had started gathering there. But there were more Muslims around than he realised, working as doctors in the area’s hospitals, or as scientists in its many pharmaceutical firms, or as engineers at a big telecommunications company. The Islamic Society had long ago outgrown its temporary space.The worshippers began to arrive, most of them men coming from office jobs, plastic ID badges hanging from their belts. They dropped their shoes in an unruly pile near the centre’s doorway, and used a cramped galley kitchen to perform wudu, the Muslim washing ritual. Then they knelt down as the muezzin sang a call to prayer.Because it lacked a permanent home, the Islamic Society had no imam, and it relied on a rotating cast to lead services. This week’s visitor, Chaudry told me, was known as “the crying imam”. That week, dozens of Syrian civilians, including many children, had been killed in a poison gas attack, and the night before, Trump had fired cruise missiles in reprisal. The imam, dressed in a long black robe, led a prayer for “our brothers and sisters in Syria”. His voice trembling, he sobbed, “Give peace to this region.”“That’s one of his characteristics,” Chaudry said after the service. “He does become emotional.” Most of the worshippers, who numbered around 70 in all, quickly returned to their cars and hurried back to work. Chaudry repacked the Mosque Mobile.“I’ve been carrying these rugs for more than 10 years now, and I’m tired of doing it,” he told me. “We need to have a place of our own.”As we drove out of Basking Ridge, Chaudry pointed out the Holy Oak, standing tall in the churchyard. The tree was rotten, he told me. Later that month, it would be cut down, and its dead branches handed out to townspeople as patriotic keepsakes.Despite Trump’s election, Chaudry still retained his hope for justice, at least for his congregation. The case was now in the courts, which meant the Justice Department couldn’t easily abandon it. The town’s government, facing an almost certain legal defeat, was under pressure from its insurance company to settle its lawsuit with the Islamic Society quickly, before a trial.Throughout the spring and summer of 2017, negotiations dragged on over a settlement, which would include a large damages payment to the Islamic Society. I attended endless meetings of the township’s elected committee, at which angry citizens would demand information from stone-faced board members, inveighing against the settlement in increasingly apocalyptic terms. Chaudry attended with other members of the Islamic Society. He sat in the front row but said nothing, keeping his head down and scribbling in a pad, showing no emotion even in the face of incendiary provocations.The opponents were a surprisingly diverse lot. There were some old-money Protestants, who complained that the hubbub would bother their horses. But some of the most emotional speakers were new residents, many of them immigrants from south and east Asia. At one meeting, one of the Islamic Society’s closest neighbours, a medical professional from India who was building a large house directly behind the mosque plot, stood up and addressed the Muslims in the audience directly.“If you are somehow able to get a mosque built, you will create a divide which you will not be able to bridge,” he said. “On the other hand, if the site would move to another appropriate location, you will earn our respect, and you will truly earn the right to build a mosque in this town. What is it that you want, to just build a mosque, or set an example for the whole country?”By the perverse logic of the mosque opponents, it was the Islamic Society that had brought discrimination upon itself, by suing over discrimination. There was only one thing the Muslims could do to prove themselves worthy neighbours: go somewhere else.It wouldn’t be fair to say, though, that everyone who spoke against the mosque was religiously motivated. Many, if not most, of the adversaries appeared to be genuinely impassioned in their opposition to development in Liberty Corner. “Sure, there’s a 5% lunatic fringe,” Paul Zubulake told me one evening while sitting on a bench outside the town hall, waiting for yet another meeting to begin. But he said that for him, and many others, religion was beside the point: “It’s about our quality of life. It’s going to destroy our community.”To show me what he loved about Liberty Corner, Zubalake invited me to visit his home, a few doors down from the Islamic Society property. When I arrived, on a rainy Memorial Day in late May, a soggy town parade was making its way down the main thoroughfare, Church Street. As Zubulake was introducing me to his family – explaining that his son has autism, and they had moved to the area for his schooling – he spotted the mayor marching by with other members of the township committee. He dashed down to the roadside and shouted: “There’s still time!”The politicians frowned and kept marching down Church Street. “I just want them to know how pissed off I am,” Zubulake said.Chaudry, meanwhile, had organised a contingent from the Islamic Society to march in the Memorial Day parade. They met in front of the house, next to a sign that Chaudry had staked in the yard, reading: “Proud to Be An American.” Whether by chance or intention, the parade’s organisers had put the Islamic Society at the very rear, right behind another marginalised group, the local Democrats. Chaudry coaxed the children who were marching with the Islamic Society’s banner to stay in a tight formation. “Good morning!” he called from beneath a big black umbrella, waving an American flag with his free hand. The parade route ended at a war memorial, where Chaudry left a wreath with a mosque insignia.“My advice to the community has always been that this is not the time to hide,” Chaudry told me later. “You have to be out there, fighting for your rights.”To some people in Basking Ridge, Chaudry’s struggle looked less noble. They saw his battle with the town government as a local political feud, which dated back to his tenure as an elected official, long before he ever proposed the mosque. Chaudry had first run for a seat on the town committee in 2001. After September 11, which hit the commuter town hard, he told the local newspaper: “We are all under attack.” But a Republican party leader called him to suggest it might be better if his campaign signs, which read “Ali Chaudry”, just used his last name. “I said everyone knows who I am,” Chaudry told me. “I’ve never kept it a secret.” He won the election. But he was not universally popular.The way the local government worked, the office of mayor rotated annually among the elected members of the township committee. In 2004, it was Chaudry’s turn. As the US’s first Pakistani-American mayor, he made a triumphant visit to his homeland, where he met with the foreign minister, and gave interviews in which he hinted that he had ambitions for higher office. But local critics found him arrogant and high-handed. The next time he was up for election, he held on to his committee seat by just 11 votes. Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via Email Religion Pinterest Share on Messenger Topics First published on Thu 8 Feb 2018 01.00 EST featureslast_img read more

Britain doesnt just glorify its violent past it gets high on it

first_imgShare via Email Afua Hirsch Opinion Tue 29 May 2018 10.35 EDT The defensive, patriotic narrative of empire has become a drug. Like all addicts, those hooked on it cannot stomach critique Shares1,0031003 There are the New Yorkers who removed the statue of J Marion Sims, the gynaecologist who experimented on enslaved black women without anaesthetic; the Ghanaians who removed a Gandhi statue; and the Bristolians who successfully campaigned to change the name of the vicious slave trader Edward Colston from the city’s famous concert hall. There are people in the Caribbean asking why they have churches dedicated to the slaveowners who tortured their ancestors; or in the case of Barbados, a statue of Horatio Nelson – friend to slaveowners and plantation interests – right in the middle of their capital.My entry into this war zone happened by accident a year ago, when I suggested on these pages that we take another look at Nelson’s legacy. I wasn’t actually waiting in a bulldozer, ready to storm Trafalgar Square, as some people seemed to believe, but simply calling for an appraisal of the hitherto obscured facts. Opinion Share via Email Topics Britain’s hostile environment has been a century in the making These wrongs do linger, because people on the other side of the imperial experience – descended from the enslaved, from the victims of colonial wars or from ravaged and exploited nations of empire, as hundreds of thousands of British people now are – are unwilling to accept the idea that the lives of their ancestors are worth less than those of the glorious British perpetrators we celebrate.I’m one of them. And when I am accused of “coming here” and “attacking our culture”, it becomes abundantly clear that the fact that someone like me is British, and that Britain is also the country made possible by the labour, wealth and culture of my antecedents, still hasn’t actually sunk in.That’s why this is not actually about statues, monuments or history, but about culture and narrative, and who gets to feel the “high” of glory. People who had that luxury stripped away from them several centuries ago already know it’s not that simple. But in Britain, there are so many still looking for their next hit.• The Battle for Britain’s Heroes will air on Channel 4 at 9pm on 29 MayThis article was amended on 31 May 2018 because the Edward Colston music hall in Bristol has not yet been renamed. It will change in 2020 It feels like I live in the middle of a culture war. On one side is a kind of state-sponsored amnesia. It’s pervasive. It’s an Oscar-winning movie perpetuating the idea that Winston Churchill stood alone, at the Darkest Hour, as Nazi fascism encroached, with Britain a small and vulnerable nation isolated in the north Atlantic. In reality the United Kingdom was at that moment an imperial power with the collective might of Indian, African, Canadian and Australian manpower, resources and wealth at its disposal.It’s also Poland passing a law so that errant historians, survivors or Auschwitz guides who raise the inconvenient fact of Polish complicity in atrocities now risk up to three years’ imprisonment. It’s Tennessee in the US legislating against the removal of Confederate statues when, as the former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu puts it, they “purposefully celebrate a fictional, sanitised Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, and the terror that it actually stood for”.On the other side are those who understand that historical narratives, monuments and statues are not some pristine record of history, but projects – often created long after the event they remember – that have weaponised history against specific groups. This is why South Africans question statues that glorified apartheid, why Native Americans protest against Thanksgiving, why indigenous Australians required a correction to the ludicrous ideas that Captain Cook “discovered” their continent or that they should celebrate the intrepid explorers who massacred their ancestors. Britain doesn’t just glorify its violent past: it gets high on it Share on Messenger Pinterest British empire Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Those facts remain of minor consequence to the vocal and influential parts of British society that regard the act of raising them as heretical. The instinct is to shoot the messenger. Our great white male media grandees – it is a remarkably consistent demographic – meet simple statements of fact about the historical record with hysterical, table-thumping personal attacks. It’s the kind of lashing out that happens when you try to wean someone off an addiction. In this case, Britain is addicted to glory.It’s understandable: it must feel nice. But, like all addictions, it brings out the worst in our psyche. Making a TV documentary on this subject that will air on Tuesday night, I was told British people should be proud of our empire because our colonies were better run than those of the Belgians or those under Nazi rule. As the rapper and activist Akala says memorably in his new book, Natives: “It’s true, but it’s a shit boast.”When the supply of glory is threatened, the gloves are off. Racial slurs become acceptable; the threats begin. One respected academic told me he was advised that if he pursued the study of Churchill’s responsibility for the number of deaths in the Bengal famine, his academic career would be compromised. This is the level of censorship to which we are willing to stoop.Britishness – at least this patriotic, defensive, glory-addicted version of it – seems to be in a highly fragile place. It cannot withstand being problematised or critiqued. Many of those I’ve raised this with in recent weeks feel especially aggrieved that someone who was apparently “allowed” into Britain’s educational and professional establishments should feel anything other than gratitude. Being privileged, and black, and then having the audacity to use my intellect and education to challenge the narrative those establishments handed me down, seems to prove particularly irksome.But we can’t detoxify Britishness and build it into a more robust, less fragile identity, until we do this work. We need to assess the true legacy of empire and the impact of its loss. We need to unpick the idea of glorious Britannia that defeated Napoleon and Hitler to find out what wrongs are still lingering in our midst. Twitter Nadifa Mohamed center_img … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Since you’re here… The bronze statue of British colonialist Cecil John Rhodes is removed from the Cape Town University campus, South Africa. Photograph: Schalk van Zuydam/AP Last modified on Wed 9 Jan 2019 12.09 EST Winston Churchill Facebook ‘One respected academic was advised that, if he pursued the study of Churchill’s responsibility for the Bengal famine, his career would be compromised.’Photograph: PA Share on WhatsApp British empire Share on Facebook Slavery Reuse this content comment Our great, white male media grandees meet simple statements of fact about the historical record with hysteria Read more Share on LinkedIn Race Support The Guardian Share on Facebook Share on Pinterestlast_img read more

Monday Tech Tip Optelec ClearReader

first_imgDavid Frye at Easter Seals Crossroads in Indiana talks about the Optelec ClearReader+, a helpful, portable device for visually impaired individuals.Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedTech Tip: Optelec ClearView COctober 20, 2014In “Tech Tips”Tech Tip: Optelec ClearView COctober 20, 2014In “Tech Tips”Monday Tech Tip: Traveler HD by OptelecNovember 2, 2015In “Tech Tips”last_img

AM153 – Talkin Pictures

first_imgPodcast: Play in new window | Download153-10-16-15 TalkinPicturesHey there! Welcome to Accessibility Minute, your weekly look at Assistive Technology, those clever tools and devices designed to help people who have difficulties with vision, mobility, hearing or other special needs!For individuals with autism, who are nonverbal, or generally have trouble communicating, there are several apps available to help. Unfortunately, so many of these apps are solely available on iOS devices. I recently stumbled across an app, called TalkinPictures, which is available for both Android and Amazon devices!TalkinPictures features a simple interface which is responsive, customizable, educational, practical and compatible with both phones and tablets! It also offers a free trial so you can try it out before you buy!To learn more about TalkinPictures, visit MyAutisticApps.com.For more information, to read our blog or to drop us a line, visit EasterSealsTech.com. That was your Accessibility Minute for this week! I¹m Laura Medcalf with the INDATA Project at Easter Seals Crossroads, in Indiana.Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedAM197 – Tippy Talk App forAutismAugust 19, 2016In “Accessibility Minute”AM232 – Claro ScanPen AppApril 21, 2017In “Accessibility Minute”AM139 – GreyMatters: Reaching Beyond DimentiaJuly 10, 2015In “Accessibility Minute”last_img read more

NewlyMinted Unicorn Outreach Looks to Next Phase of Growth with the Addition

first_imgNewly-Minted Unicorn Outreach Looks to Next Phase of Growth with the Addition of Three Key Executives PRNewswireJuly 11, 2019, 5:29 pmJuly 11, 2019 Marketing TechnologyNewsOutreachsales engagement platformVoice engineering Previous ArticleCox Media Group Chooses Veritone for AI-Driven Advertising Analytics and Online Content CurationNext ArticleAcorn International’s Digital Services Division Adds Chef Works to Growing Roster of Brands Outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, is adding to its leadership ranks as three new executives join the fast-growing Seattle startup. Margaret Arakawa has joined as Chief Marketing Officer, Amritansh Raghav now serves as the Executive Vice President of Product and Engineering, and Abhi Abhishek serves as the company’s Vice President of Voice engineering for the platform.“Outreach has already experienced incredible growth, but we’ve been looking to add leaders who will help get us to that next phase,” said Manny Medina, Chief Executive Officer of Outreach. “Finding leaders who are the right fit for our culture and have the right experience is key. Margaret, Amritansh, and Abhi are already proven leaders in their respective fields and their experience will be instrumental in shaping the growth of the platform. Under their leadership, we are continuing to scale our marketing efforts and further our technological capabilities in artificial intelligence as we deliver a complete system of action through a single pane of glass for all customer-facing teams.” Marketing Technology News: Medallia Announces Launch of Initial Public OfferingArakawa brings significant experience in building brands and delivering revenue growth. She joins Outreach from Microsoft where she spent almost 20 years in positions of increasing responsibility in the global Windows, Security, and Cloud & Enterprise business groups. Most recently, she was responsible for leading the multi-billion dollar U.S. Windows and Surface businesses. At Outreach, Arakawa oversees all aspects of marketing including brand, communications, demand generation, and product marketing. Arakawa earned a Bachelor of Science degree from The Wharton School and a Master of Business Administration degree from the Kellogg School of Management. She and her husband are passionate fundraisers for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Firefighter Stairclimb, which raises money to combat blood cancers – the most common cancer impacting children. Arakawa lives in the Seattle area with her husband and 11-year-old son.Raghav is well-versed in both the large enterprise and startup world. He spent significant time at Microsoft, including overseeing Skype as the Corporate Vice President of Product and Engineering. He was also in a leadership role at Fuze as the Senior Vice President of Engineering and Product, and at Google as the Engineering Director of the Google Compute Engine. At Outreach, Raghav is responsible for overseeing the Product, Engineering and Design organizations. He has a Bachelor’s degree in electronics and communication Engineering from IIT Varanasi in India and a Master’s degree in electrical engineering from Binghamton University. Raghav currently lives in Palo Alto, CA with his family, including his two sons, ages 11 and 7.Marketing Technology News: Sponsorship Made Simple for Personal, College, Sports, Community Events etc.Abhishek has led product engineering organizations for more than 15 years. Most recently, he served as head of engineering and applied science for the Ambient Intelligence solution area in the Business Artificial Intelligence organization at Microsoft. Throughout his career at Microsoft, he is most proud of his work on Skype Translator, a groundbreaking technology that transcended boundaries of real-time human-computer interaction. At Outreach, Abhishek’s knowledge of voice infrastructure and applied AI will help Outreach deliver a best-in-class intelligent voice offering to help Outreach in leading the development and application of AI for customer-facing team.Marketing Technology News: SeQuel Response Hires New Director of Marketing to Propel Brand Awarenesslast_img read more

AMD Will Provide a Free Temporary UEFI Upgrade Kit for Ryzen 3000

first_img The Hate for ‘Captain Marvel’ May Never Stop Saying Goodbye to Johnny Depp Tagged In amdcpusuefibiosRyzen 3000Ryzen 7 3700XcompatibilityBIOS updateUEFI updateX470 motherboardX570 motherboard Post a Comment 38 Comments Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 20shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. The Real Reason the ‘Blade’ Reboot Is Happening By Joel Hruska on July 16, 2019 at 10:05 am Movies That Are Primed and Ready for a Prequel New Details Confirmed About Natalie Portman As Mighty Thor 38 Comments AMD has once again refreshed its backward compatibility program and will offer customers who buy a Ryzen 3000 CPU without a compatible motherboard an APU they can use to update their systems. This program, which has been in place for several years now, is a solution to the perennial issue of CPU/APU upgrades not being backward compatible with older motherboards.To be clear: This issue is longstanding and has existed for decades. When CPU designers release new CPUs, UEFI/BIOS updates are always required to add support for the new chips. The reason this has been a topic we’ve returned to multiple times in the Ryzen era is that AMD made it a point to emphasize backward compatibility with Ryzen. This means more CPUs have been launched for older platforms, which increases the chance of hitting this problem.With that said, there may be reasons for AMD customers to prefer older chipsets with the Ryzen 7 3000 family, and that makes this offer important. We have been investigating third-generation Ryzen power consumption and the associated power consumption of X470 and X570 motherboards since before the Ryzen 7 review embargo lifted. While the X570 motherboard family provides newer features, like PCIe 4.0 support, these boards also consume more power than the X470 family.The gap can be significant in some cases, and the gap means that the X470 may be a better choice for customers who are looking to build the most power-efficient system possible. But this also introduces the possibility that you’ll end up buying a motherboard that isn’t compatible with the latest CPUs, due to having been stocked before the chips launched.If you need a CPU to perform a UEFI update, AMD will ship you one, provided you have made a valid purchase of a 3rd gen Ryzen CPU and can’t boot the motherboard due to a UEFI update issue. Send AMD a photo of your CPU (with serial numbers visible) and a copy or summary of communication with your motherboard manufacturer to indicate why support from the OEM won’t resolve the problem. AMD’s help page goes through several options that may help users fix the problem without needing a new CPU, but whether these work will depend on whether the motherboard supports features like UEFI / BIOS flashback.AMD will ship users an Athlon 200GE with prepaid return shipping to perform the update. The CPU must be returned within 10 days, but users are free to keep the included thermal solution if they so desire. Those who need to apply for a kit can do so here. Include your CPU serial number in the product details and enter the phrase “Boot kit Required” (without quotes) in the “Problem Description” field.Now Read:Destiny 2 Doesn’t Currently Run on Ryzen 3000 CPUs, but a Fix Is ComingAMD’s Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 9 3900X Reviewed: Red Storm RyzenNew Leak: Intel 10-Core Comet Lake CPUs Will Counterattack Ryzen 3000 Family Maisie Williams’ Transformation is Turning Heads The Truth Behind the Affair That Halted Meg Ryan’s Career AMD Will Provide a Free Temporary UEFI Upgrade Kit for Ryzen 3000 Motherboard Updates Proof Henry Cavill Isn’t a Very Good Dude at All You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNetlast_img read more

The Snapdragon 215 Could Make Cheap Phones Less Terrible

first_img Maisie Williams’ Transformation is Turning Heads Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 0shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. 4 Comments You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNet The Snapdragon 215 Could Make Cheap Phones Less Terrible 10 Scientifically Proven Side Effects of Growing a Beard We Finally Understand Why Hollywood Dumped Wesley Snipes Things Only Adults Notice in ‘ThunderCats’ New TV Shows That Will Absolutely Get Canceled in 2019 You’d never expect a sub-$100 phone to be as fast as a flagship device like the Pixel 3 or Galaxy S10, but they can still be unreasonably slow sometimes. The bargain-priced Qualcomm Snapdragon 200-series chips have offered bare minimum performance in the past, but the company’s new Snapdragon 215 system-on-a-chip (SoC) could make ultra-cheap phones much more usable with better performance, higher resolutions, and more. The Snapdragon 215 replaces the 210, which has been a bottom-tier chip for Qualcomm since 2014. You’d see the 210 most often in ultra-cheap unlocked phones from white label manufacturers. Those are the sort of phones no one necessarily wants to use but plenty of people still do. The 215 SoC is a quantum leap over the 210 — Qualcomm says it’s 50 percent faster across the board. Like the old 210, the SD215 has a quad-core CPU. However, it has Cortex A53 cores instead of the aging A7 CPUs. These 64-bit cores are considerably faster and more efficient than the old 32-bit A7s. Cheap phones are slowly moving toward tall display ratios like 18:9, and the Snapdragon 215 will support that up to HD+ at 720×1560 (19.9:9). The more powerful Adreno 308 GPU can also decode video and render games more easily. It’s 28 percent faster than the 210’s GPU while offering better video battery life. Qualcomm’s new chip will also help budget phones compete on the camera front with its dual ISP (image signal processors). The 215 supports dual camera setups for enhanced depth sensing and portrait effects. Camera resolution also gets a boost to 13MP from 8MP on the 210. The new Hexagon DSP allows for about five days of music playback on an average phone, and apps that use sensors like GPS won’t drain the battery as much. The new SoC has more wireless capabilities, too. There’s NFC support for the first time on a 200-series chip. It was understandable to omit that in 2014, but mobile payments are much more common now. There’s also dual-SIM support with VoLTE on both cards. The updated 802.11ac Wi-Fi radio also means faster speeds, up to 433Mbps down. However, LTE still tops out at 150Mbps like the 210 (it has the same old X5 LTE modem). The first devices with the Snapdragon 215 will launch later in 2019. While it supports more features, there’s no guarantee device makers will utilize all the technologies offered by the Snapdragon 215. Phones with this SoC will cost well under $100, so there’s not going to be room for all the bells and whistles. Now read:The Entire Semiconductor Market Just Suffered the Worst Downturn in a DecadeReport: Apple Bought Loads of Cheap Patents to Make Qualcomm Look BadIntel CPU Shortage Could Worsen in Q2 2019, Opening Path for ARM, AMD Jim Carrey’s Tragic Life Just Gets Sadder and Sadder By Ryan Whitwam on July 9, 2019 at 3:29 pm The Most Inappropriate Comic Book Characters Ever Tagged In smartphonesmobileARMqualcommsystem-on-a-chip Post a Comment 4 Comments Marvel Fans Are Hoping Valkyrie Finds Her Queenlast_img read more

Hubble Spots a Black Hole That Shouldnt Exist

first_img By Ryan Whitwam on July 13, 2019 at 8:20 am Directors Just Hinted At a Major Return From ‘Endgame’ Sun Baby From ‘Teletubbies’ Is 22 Now & Unrecognizably Gorgeous 13 Comments The Tragedy of Marie Osmond Just Keeps Getting Sadder and Sadder Cartoon Episodes So Controversial They Were Banned Conventional wisdom holds that most large galaxies harbor supermassive black holes at their centers. Scientists also believe that only so-called “active” galaxies should have visible accretion disc of matter, but the Hubble Space Telescope has found one around a black hole with unusually low luminosity. This galaxy might bend the rules a bit, but it offers an opportunity to study how the theory of relativity applies in the real world. NGC 3147 is a large spiral galaxy just a bit smaller than our own Milky Way. It sits about 120 million light-years away — you’ve probably seen pictures of it because it’s quite stunning. Active galaxies like quasars are easy to spot. The matter falling into them produces emissions across the electromagnetic spectrum, and the accretion discs are quite visible. Everyone thought NGC 3147 was far too dim to have a disc of its own, but a new analysis from an international team suggests otherwise. Hubble collected data from the central black hole in NGC 3147, which has a mass about 250 million times greater than our sun. The object turns out to have a thin disc of material similar to what you’d find around an active galactic nucleus. Observations from Hubble show the disc spins at about 10 percent the speed of light. Researcher Stefano Bianchi from the Università degli Studi Roma Tre in Italy says this discovery indicates the current models for low luminosity galaxies have “clearly failed.”This discovery could have far-reaching effects on the way we model galaxies and black holes, but it also could lead to a better understanding of the physics underlying supermassive objects. The fast-moving disc combined with the low apparent brightness of NGC 3147 could make it possible to test both general and special relativity. General relativity deals with the mechanisms of gravity in the universe, and special relativity describes the relationship between space and time. Since NGC 3147 is dimmer than a typical active galaxy, we can make out the accretion disc around it much better. The disc is inside the black hole’s powerful gravity field where scientists can study the way it affects light. Based on findings in NGC 3147, astronomers may now go on the hunt for other weakly active galaxies. Some may even be closer to Earth where we can make even more precise measurements to test Einstein’s theories.Now read:Cold Quasars Could Change Our Understandings of Galactic DeathAstronomers Capture Historic First Photo of Black HoleResearchers Use Supersonic Fluid to Test Hawking’s Black Hole Theories Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 0shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. This ‘Fire Emblem Heroes’ April Fools’ Day Joke Broke Hearts Tagged In sciencespaceastronomyphysicsblack holeshubblegalaxiessupermassive black holes Post a Comment 13 Comments Jim Carrey’s Tragic Life Just Gets Sadder and Sadder ‘Dark Phoenix’ Director Reveals Who Is to Blame for Massive Flop Hubble Spots a Black Hole That Shouldn’t Exist Why The Hound May Have Been ‘GOT’s’ Most Important Character You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNetlast_img read more

AMD Will Provide a Free Temporary UEFI Upgrade Kit for Ryzen 3000

first_img AMD has once again refreshed its backward compatibility program and will offer customers who buy a Ryzen 3000 CPU without a compatible motherboard an APU they can use to update their systems. This program, which has been in place for several years now, is a solution to the perennial issue of CPU/APU upgrades not being backward compatible with older motherboards.To be clear: This issue is longstanding and has existed for decades. When CPU designers release new CPUs, UEFI/BIOS updates are always required to add support for the new chips. The reason this has been a topic we’ve returned to multiple times in the Ryzen era is that AMD made it a point to emphasize backward compatibility with Ryzen. This means more CPUs have been launched for older platforms, which increases the chance of hitting this problem.With that said, there may be reasons for AMD customers to prefer older chipsets with the Ryzen 7 3000 family, and that makes this offer important. We have been investigating third-generation Ryzen power consumption and the associated power consumption of X470 and X570 motherboards since before the Ryzen 7 review embargo lifted. While the X570 motherboard family provides newer features, like PCIe 4.0 support, these boards also consume more power than the X470 family.The gap can be significant in some cases, and the gap means that the X470 may be a better choice for customers who are looking to build the most power-efficient system possible. But this also introduces the possibility that you’ll end up buying a motherboard that isn’t compatible with the latest CPUs, due to having been stocked before the chips launched.If you need a CPU to perform a UEFI update, AMD will ship you one, provided you have made a valid purchase of a 3rd gen Ryzen CPU and can’t boot the motherboard due to a UEFI update issue. Send AMD a photo of your CPU (with serial numbers visible) and a copy or summary of communication with your motherboard manufacturer to indicate why support from the OEM won’t resolve the problem. AMD’s help page goes through several options that may help users fix the problem without needing a new CPU, but whether these work will depend on whether the motherboard supports features like UEFI / BIOS flashback.AMD will ship users an Athlon 200GE with prepaid return shipping to perform the update. The CPU must be returned within 10 days, but users are free to keep the included thermal solution if they so desire. Those who need to apply for a kit can do so here. Include your CPU serial number in the product details and enter the phrase “Boot kit Required” (without quotes) in the “Problem Description” field.Now Read:Destiny 2 Doesn’t Currently Run on Ryzen 3000 CPUs, but a Fix Is ComingAMD’s Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 9 3900X Reviewed: Red Storm RyzenNew Leak: Intel 10-Core Comet Lake CPUs Will Counterattack Ryzen 3000 Family Things Only Adults Notice in ‘ThunderCats’ 37 Comments Reality TV Scandals We Never Saw Coming AMD Will Provide a Free Temporary UEFI Upgrade Kit for Ryzen 3000 Motherboard Updates Lilly From ‘Princess Diaries’ Is 36 Now and Gorgeous You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNet Don’t Watch These Movies With Your Parents Movies That Are Hard To Believe Actually Exist Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 20shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. Maisie Williams’ Transformation is Turning Heads By Joel Hruska on July 16, 2019 at 10:05 am Huge Scandals That Rocked The History Channel Tagged In amdcpusuefibiosRyzen 3000Ryzen 7 3700XcompatibilityBIOS updateUEFI updateX470 motherboardX570 motherboard Post a Comment 37 Comments The First ‘Scary MCU Film’ Will Come Out During Phase 4last_img read more

SiriusDecisions Summit 2019 Takeaways Enablement May Not be a Word But Its

first_imgSiriusDecisions Summit 2019 Takeaways: Enablement May Not be a Word, But It’s Growing Nonetheless John RaguinMay 17, 2019, 3:00 pmMay 17, 2019 analyticsB2B salesSales and marketingSales EnablementSeisimicSiriusDecisions Previous ArticleIKEA Pulls the Rug from Under the Competition as Game of Thrones Ads Catch Fire on SocialNext ArticleStringr Announces Expansion Into the UK Market SiriusDecisions Summit is one of my favorite B2B sales and marketing industry events of the year. After a few days of meeting with customers and partners, networking and walking the show floor, I left the 2019 event feeling inspired at how far sales and marketing has come just since the previous year’s Summit.Sales enablement is one such area that is growing at an unstoppable rate. With more than 60 percent of organizations investing in sales enablement, it was unsurprisingly a hot topic of conversation at SiriusDecisions Summit. Rapid category growth allows for a lot of opportunity for practitioners to apply sales enablement programs to their organization. And, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. If you were to ask five different sales enablement leaders how they approach their work and job, you’d probably get five different answers. Technically, enablement is not even a word according to major dictionaries like Merriam-Webster and American Heritage (more on that later).Recommended: Is Person-Based Marketing an Upgrade to ABM?As a CMO, the opportunity circling sales enablement makes me very excited for sales and marketing’s future (and SiriusDecisions Summit 2020!). With that, here are a few takeaways from this year’s event:Sales Enablement’s Value is ClearA few years ago, sales enablement was barely recognized as a term, but today, according to LinkedIn, 7,000 people have ‘enablement’ in their job title.Between 2014 and 2018, there was a 180 percent increase in LinkedIn search results of “sales enablement,” and between 2016 and 2018, there was a 118 percent increase in LinkedIn job titles with “sales enablement.”While the validity of the word itself continues to unfortunately be murky, the industry is unanimous on sales enablement’s importance. In fact, at the Summit, Forrester Principal Analyst Mary Shea named the implementation of a sales enablement solution as a key way to prepare for the future of sales and suggested that “sales enablement leaders will become strategic business architects.”Read More: Social Media vs. Messaging Apps: What Brand Marketers Need to KnowEnablement is No Longer Just for SalesSales enablement’s value has been proven to the point in which enablement no longer just applies to sales. In his Summit talk, SiriusDecisions Sr. Research Director Peter Ostrow pointed out that ‘enablement’ has extended to other customer-facing teams like partners and customer success (CS).Once a prospect becomes a customer, it’s just as important for communication to be tailored, and for these teams to gather insights from that communication to strengthen and grow the relationship. As the subscription economy continues to gain steam, and commoditization occurs everywhere you look, companies are competing on product and price less and less. Offering an unbeatable customer experience establishes the kind of loyalty that sets both B2B and B2C brands apart from the competition.In one example, enablement tools could surface easily-accessible data and analytics, so CS teams can be proactive about leveraging a customer’s preferences, purchase history and more. In this way, enablement not only adds value to another stage of the customer journey, but it could help accelerate upsell and cross-sell opportunities for current customers.Read More: Customer Lifetime Value (CLV): the MVP of Your Marketing MetricsThe Sales Community is Incredibly SupportiveFor practitioners on the hunt for more information or a forum to ask for advice, there is no shortage of resources and communities about sales enablement and related functions. Whether tapping into the Sales Enablement Society (SES), American Association of Inside Sales Professionals (AA-ISP), Smart Selling Tools, or the many others, I’ve always found the sense of camaraderie among sales professionals to be very strong.This was validated for me through the response to the campaign launched at SiriusDecisions Summit to petition dictionaries like Merriam-Webster and American Heritage to make ‘enablement’ a real word. Enablement pros solve real problems in their organization on a daily basis, and yet enablement is not recognized as a real word.Seismic was joined by a growing list of 25 partners, industry associations and other vendors, including the Sales Enablement Society, Kapost, Bigtincan, Brainshark, Gainsight and others, that were eager to help promote the campaign and gain petition signatures. At 1,200+ signatures from more than 330 companies, many of which were obtained at SiriusDecisions Summit, the campaign is not over, and organizations are continuing to join the movement.Join the community and sign the petition to make ‘enablement’ a real word here.Read More: Think Before the Ad using Customer Datalast_img read more

John Bonapace Joins Secure24 Executive Leadership Team as Chief Marketing Officer

first_img Jeff EspositoMarketing TechnologyNewsNTT CommunicationsSecure-24strengthening brands Previous ArticleYelp Helped Seat 4.5 Million Diners Mother’s Day Weekend, Building on the Momentum of Yelp Reservations and WaitlistNext ArticleHG Insights Fuels Precision Marketing and Sales Programs at Scale with Marketo Engage New Role Focused on Strengthening Brand and Accelerating GrowthSecure-24, an NTT Communications Company, and a leading global provider of comprehensive managed cloud services, IT operations, and applications hosting, announced that John Bonapace, a marketing leader with a track record of strengthening brands and accelerating revenue growth, will be joining the company’s executive team in the newly created role of Chief Marketing Officer (CMO). In this role, Bonapace will be responsible for establishing strategic partnerships, driving new business development opportunities and executing the company’s go-to-market strategy.@Secure_24 Appoints John Bonapace as Chief Marketing OfficerBonapace is an accomplished business leader who brings more than 25 years of executive experience leading high-performance global sales, business development and marketing teams. Most recently he coached CEO and executive directors on strategic business development and marketing. In the role of Secure-24 CMO Bonapace will report to Jeff Esposito, Chief Revenue Officer.“John has a unique blend of marketing and business development experience that will be a valuable addition to the organization, and we are excited to welcome him to the team,” says Jeff Esposito, Chief Revenue Officer, Secure-24. “His appointment underscores our commitment to expanding the depth of our partnerships, refining our go-to-market strategy, and driving continued business growth.”Marketing Technology News: revital U International Unveils New Sales App with VERB’s Interactive Video FeaturesBonapace has worked in technology with enterprises and partners in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Healthcare, Finance and Insurance industries. Prior to joining Secure-24, he was a Business Unit Leader for the Oracle business practice at Meta7, a division of Forsythe Technology, where he drove marketing, business development and sales. He also served as an Area Vice President at Oracle responsible for hardware sales, and as a Global Client Executive and Director of Field Marketing at Sun Microsystems, where he spent the majority of his career.“I have always admired Secure 24’s company culture and its highly motivated and loyal employees. Great employees translate into highly satisfied clients. I’m excited to join the leadership team to help drive industry-leading managed IT services that optimize our clients’ technology portfolios. The opportunity to work with great people and grow the company is special, and that is why I joined Secure 24,” said John Bonapace.Marketing Technology News: Spectrum Equity Announces Sale of Ethoca to MastercardBonapace is active in the Detroit community, contributing his time to non-profit charities. From 2009 to 2018, he served on the board at the Michigan Council of Women in Technology (MCWT), and he currently leads fundraisers and provides coaching and mentoring at MCWT.Marketing Technology News: True Influence Hires Data Strategist and Marketing Technology Visionary Ray Estevez as Chief Data Officer John Bonapace Joins Secure-24 Executive Leadership Team as Chief Marketing Officer PRNewswireMay 29, 2019, 1:17 pmMay 29, 2019 last_img read more

MarTech Interview with Ajay Gupta CEO at Stirista

first_img Ajay Gupta has served as CEO of Stirista since founding the company in 2010 at age 26. Without accepting external funding, Ajay has overseen the data-driven, marketing services company’s rapid year-to-year financial growth as it has progressed from 2 employees, working out of an apartment, to a 41-person team spanning three continents.Ajay holds a bachelor’s degree in Financial Economics and Creative Writing with a Mathematics minor from St. Lawrence University, as well as an MFA in Creative Writing from Texas State University. He has been named a Marketing EDGE Rising Star and was part of the San Antonio Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 list. Under his leadership, Stirista has won a DMA Silver ECHO award, a third-place DMN Award, and has been included on the Inc 5000 list. Tell us about your role and journey in starting Stirista? What opportunity did you see in Data Marketing?My wife, Candice, and I started Stirista in 2010 from our apartment with the goal of offering marketers the data they needed to run more sophisticated multicultural marketing campaigns. Marketing data hadn’t caught up with America’s changing demographic makeup, and we saw a significant opportunity to make a difference. At the time, we had no idea we would grow as quickly as we have!What is Stirista today and how much has it evolved since inception?Today, we have offices in three different countries, and our offerings go well outside of multicultural data (though I think we still do that pretty well, too). Our consumer database alone contains nearly every adult in the US, and we constantly try to push the envelope of what’s possible to offer marketers. Most recently, we launched a product called Visitor ID Graph, which enables marketers to match anonymous website visitors with real identities.What separates Stirista from other B2B compilers?The line between B2B and B2C personas is getting increasingly blurry, especially as more professionals use their personal devices in some capacity for work. One of our major differentiators in the B2B space is a product we call StiristaLink. StiristaLink is a proprietary connection between our B2B and B2C datasets. That enables B2B marketers to reach their prospects when they are outside of work.Our omnichannel ad services are another major differentiator. We can use our data to execute marketing campaigns across email, digital, social, connected TV, and other channels.What are some emerging Marketing Technology trends you are following?Increasingly companies are struggling with too much data. There’s data everywhere and every silo. Each individual Marketing manager is running campaigns for individual products. CRM for Sales, Automation for Marketing. I see Customer Data Platforms as the next big thing in Marketing Technology. One true source for data within an organization.What areas do you predict marketers will struggle with their data in the future?I predict that fragmented data will continue to plague marketers. Something I hear frequently from brand marketers is that their CRM, prospecting and other data sets are managed by completely different teams. This work often spans different departments with separate budgets, making a unified platform difficult to implement. How can Marketing Leaders adapt to the evolving needs of the industry? For a long time, Senior Marketing positions have had a strong foundation in more traditional business functions; after all, most marketing degrees are part of universities’ business schools. Today, however, the role requires an increasingly broad understanding of technology in addition to business. A CMO today might not need to know how to create an API or code a website, but they do need to know what an API is capable of or how SQL databases generally work.What are your predictions on the most impactful disruptions in Data-driven Marketing for businesses in 2019-2020?The age of big data is evolving into the age of making better sense of data. Companies that can provide insights in an easy to navigate environment will prevail.What startups in the technology industry are you keenly watching right now?Sadly, the startups that get the most attention are the ones getting the most funding. Most of them won’t be around in another 5 years. I prefer to look at bootstrapped companies that understand the value of a dollar.One word that describes how you work.Relentless.What’s your smartest work-related shortcut or productivity hack?Startups should invest in a proper email server that syncs across devices. Too many people, including me, cut corners and get the free email that comes with email providers which do not sync your phone calendar with your Outlook.What are you currently reading?I’ve been resting my eyes and listening to Serial Season 3. I prefer non-business books and fiction is a good way to refresh and recharge.What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?I have a great amount of respect for my father, who started as a Junior Bank Officer and has worked his way up at the Bank of India. His perspective has shaped the way I manage and deal with people in general, no matter how confrontational they are. He taught me to always treat people with respect and that there is no reason to burn bridges.What apps/software/tools can’t you live without? Gmail for Business, Linkedin, Stirista Scout, WhatsApp.Something you do better than others – the secret of your success?My one greatest talent is something I believe anyone can master–Determination. Human determination is something that fascinates me. It drives people to run ultra-marathons and climb the world’s highest mountains. While I won’t ever do either of those, I believe determination can manifest in the kinds of daily actions–such as answering nearly every email I receive the same day–which helps build a company.Tag the one person in the industry whose answers to these questions you would love to read.Matt Staudt, President, Venture Development Center.Thank you, Ajay! That was fun and hope to see you back on MarTech Series soon. About AjayAbout StiristaAbout Ajay MarTech Interview Series MarTech Interview with Ajay Gupta, CEO at Stirista Sudipto GhoshJuly 10, 2019, 1:30 pmJuly 10, 2019 “The line between B2B and B2C personas is getting increasingly blurry, especially as more professionals use their personal devices in some capacity for work.”center_img Stirista founded in September 2009, Stirista is a digital marketing agency that specializes in B2B and B2C segmentation, email marketing, and display advertising. We love data and want to put it to use for you. We believe our services can help you find new clients, and we’ll do our best to accomplish that. The MTS Martech Interview Series is a fun Q&A style chat which we really enjoy doing with martech leaders. With inspiration from Lifehacker’s How I work interviews, the MarTech Series Interviews follows a two part format On Marketing Technology, and This Is How I Work. The format was chosen because when we decided to start an interview series with the biggest and brightest minds in martech – we wanted to get insight into two areas … one – their ideas on marketing tech and two – insights into the philosophy and methods that make these leaders tick. About Stirista Ajay GuptaB2Bcrmcustomer datainterviewsmarketing campaignsStirista Previous ArticleNEORIS Launched Augmented Intelligence Practice to Spur Data-driven Business InnovationNext ArticleParks Associates: 79% of Consumers are Concerned About Data Security or Privacy Issueslast_img read more

JumpCrew Announces Inaugural Conference JumpCon The Digital Sales Transformation Summit

first_imgJumpCrew Announces Inaugural Conference “JumpCon: The Digital Sales Transformation Summit” Business WireJuly 11, 2019, 6:34 pmJuly 11, 2019 October 24 Event to Spotlight Sales Transformation and the Power of Combining Digital Marketing with SalesJumpCrew, the leading demand generation platform that integrates sales and marketing to accelerate new customer acquisition, will host its inaugural conference, JumpCon: The Digital Sales Transformation Summit on Thursday Oct. 24, 2019 at Marathon Music Works in Nashville. The one-day conference will feature talks by industry leaders that educate attendees on leading digital sales transformation and implement an integrated sales and marketing approach to improve conversions, acquire customers and increase revenue.“JumpCon gives us the ability to connect world-renowned speakers with world-class sales and marketing professionals looking to up their game,” said Chief Marketing Officer of JumpCrew, Lavall Chichester. “I’m excited to bring them together with the support of partners like Twitter, Outreach and Salesforce who have so much to offer businesses in order to help them grow. We’ll be making symbiotic connections that will change peoples’ careers and businesses.”The line-up of speakers includes:Rand Fishkin, Co-Founder of Moz, CEO of Sparktoro and acclaimed authorAlden Mills, CEO of Perfect Fitness, author and ex-Navy SEALNancy Meyer, Publisher and GM, South Florida Sun Sentinel and Orlando SentinelDave Scott, Director of Global Marketing, Twitter BusinessRahul Sabnis, EVP, Chief Creative Officer, iHeartMediaMeghan Graham, Exec Strategy Director, T Brand Studio, New York TimesLauren Bailey, President and Founder, Factor 8, The Sales Bar, and #GirlsClubTiara Puglisi, Group Director, Connection Strategy, R/GAChristopher Boon, SVP, Audience Insights, Dstillery and others.The programming will focus on utilizing the three P’s (Purpose, People, Process) of digital sales transformation. These P’s bring sales and marketing together in order to achieve results and transform businesses.Marketing Technology News: Sponsorship Made Simple for Personal, College, Sports, Community Events etc.Featured JumpCon topics include:Purpose: Knowing your brand purpose will help you grow an engaged audience – Topics include: Audience development, Influencer marketing, brand building, the power of company culture and morePeople: Great people build great brands Topics include: How to build unstoppable teams, lessons from hiring 100 people in 100 days, learn how to learn to expedite employee and company success, and moreProcess: Proven processes provide predictable profits Topics include: How to integrate sales and marketing, essential sales and marketing tools, how to find and leverage new channels like voice, streaming radio, PODCasts, how to use search to grow and monetize D2C and publisher/media brands.Marketing Technology News: SeQuel Response Hires New Director of Marketing to Propel Brand Awareness“We’re excited to host our first JumpCon conference – the only industry event focused on integrated sales and marketing,” said David Pachter, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman at JumpCrew. “By using technology to bring sales and marketing together, attendees will learn techniques to transform their businesses and achieve tremendous results.”In addition to the line-up of speakers, conference attendees will have the opportunity to connect with 250+ influential thought leaders in sales and marketing including Directors, VPs, CMOs and CEOs while learning from transformative content. On Wednesday, Oct. 23 prior to the conference, Lauren Bailey founder of #GirlsClub will host a women’s mixer to foster relationships and offer advice on how women can grow to leadership positions in sales and marketing organizations.Sponsors of the inaugural JumpCon event include Twitter, Salesforce, Dialpad, Outreach.io, Sales Hacker, Ambition, dstillery and beautyblender.Marketing Technology News: Medallia Announces Launch of Initial Public Offering customer acquisitionDigital Sales TransformationJumpCrewMarketing Technology NewsNews Previous ArticleInpixon to Acquire Indoor Mapping Leader JibestreamNext ArticleValassis’ Marketing Technology Platform Earns Tech Awardlast_img read more